Posts Tagged ‘Abstraction’

Large Landscape Works on Paper

April 11, 2017

I am always on the lookout for interesting art work … in person or out in the digital universe.  Recently, while trying to find examples of engaging artworks for my students to connect to, I came across the work of Michelle Lauriat.

Michele Lauriat, Phil's Hill (#3)

Mixed media, 90×55, from the Phil’s Hill series

 

Frankly, I was surprised and so very excited to find her large works combining drawing and painting on paper. I think my pleasure was so intense because she works much as I do in my sketching … but does so on such a larger scale. The work also reminds me just a bit of the image making path that I was on in my early 20’s.  So, I feel enthralled by the newness and freshness of her work while also sensing a degree of aesthetic kinship.

 

 

Mixed media, Echo Lake Series, 55×42

Ms. Lauriat’s pieces hover between drawing and full-bodied painting; making use of discrete but rich patches of color as well as subtle staining of the surfaces. Using copious amounts of negative space along with fields of color and value, she carefully articulates space/depth and a tentative feeling of solidity. While there is much visible evidence of early exploratory gestural mark making that she has left exposed and even foregrounded, there are also areas that she fills with marks and passages that hint at or describe perceived textures and also bolster the visceral activation of the surface design of her work.


I see Lauriat’s working method combining a decisively bold, and at times elegant, editing process with an eye for richly observed and rendered details from the natural world.  The results are exquisite combinations of mimetic accuracy and dramatic abstraction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Her website is visually easy to explore and she blogs at … http://blog.michelelauriat.com

Enjoy!

 

Visual Confections

October 6, 2013

Sometimes, an artist confuses me. That is what Sara Lutz’s work does. I’ll get back to that in a moment.

1. We all know some artists WANT to confuse us … it is part of their way of working, the very reason for working. Fine.

2. There are other artists who just don’t get what they are doing … and confuse us because they are, themselves, confused. I have done that. Come on, let us be honest, most of us have. Way to often.

But Sara Lutz’s painting do not seem to want to confuse us. They are richly layered, dense visual experiences. There are multiple thin veils of hue and tone washing over shapes. These are broken by thicker, viscous skins of color and value that barely cling to the surface or gloriously, happily, run and drip across it. There are shapes, created with dense slabs of paint … thick skeins, skittering across the thinner layers, globular masses lathered on with serious joy. On this level, I like them, love might be a better word.

detail Lutz, Pavlova

I see the tradition of Titian, Hals, Manet, Vlaminck, and Pendergast.  Looking at the surfaces it is evident that there is a mind at play with paint. It feels good, rewardingly good. Ms. Lutz’s work is a textural feast!

Then I get confused … confused and conflicted by my reaction to the color.

Yes, there is much here that reminds me of the serious and beautiful work of Kandinsky, Joan Mitchell, and maybe something of Niki de St.Phalle. But there is also something of Philip Guston in this work. And the decomposing fleshiness and wilting, sugary emulsions by Gusten have always repulsed me. Ms. Lutz has even named some of her work after frothy, sweet creations from the candy shop (Confection and Nonpareils). I am conflicted, caught between one structure that I am drawn to, another I am repulsed by.

Don’t get me wrong, 1) I like sweets. 2) On the art-history side, I have grown to admire much of  Rococo art (despite some of my teacher’s best efforts). My work sometimes plays along the with the joyous coloration of that period. 3) Certainly, on the painter’s craft-side, I like almost every variety of  the slippery, scruffy, gooey, lumpy, abraded, liquidity of painted surfaces.

Why can’t I embrace a painting that is structured like a Kandinsky or a MacDonald-Wright …  but with a color palette that could be from a licorice all-sorts bag? What is it that causes my confusion; why am I so very conflicted?

(Why don’t you check out this site (http://hyperallergic.com/86795/beer-with-a-painter-sarah-lutz/) … and see and read a bit more about her work. It is well written. Decide what you think for yourself. See if my visual sweet tooth has decayed or not.  And, please, let me know what you think.)

http://hyperallergic.com/86795/beer-with-a-painter-sarah-lutz/


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