Posts Tagged ‘art +nature’

New Work; From Plein Air Sketch to Finished Pieces

August 5, 2014

I love mixing and matching … aligning and contrasting. I do it with media. I do it with imagery and content. I’ll even use that way of working with design and stylistic approaches. Mash-up isn’t quite the right word; it is the right concept though. Maybe I am overly invested in both classicism and the early modern.

one of the studies, a reference photo, and an early stage of “Trees In Pacific Afternoon Light”

This week, as I prepare the last pieces for a two-person exhibit at a college in North Carolina, I have had several pieces that have been a hard to bring to fruition. One of them seems to have hit upon a happy ending … the other two, I am still struggling with.

Seashore-Trees,-process-3,-WEB

watercolor study, 5 x 11, from a sketch made looking across a wall from the Getty Villa

The first, an image that started as a sketch out in S. California, became a small series of watercolor studies. Soon, using the rough sketch, studies, and a dozen or more reference photos … I began the painting on an aqueous media panel.

the central image, 3rd stage ... watercolor on a 12 x 12 panel.

the central image, 3rd stage … watercolor on a 12 x 12 panel


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

None of my photos captured the almost golden light I sensed that afternoon as I prepared to enter the Getty Villa. But working from my sketch and color notes … I played about until I got an image that did portray the felt color of that afternoon.

A few days ago, as the painted section with the trees neared completion, I added a few passages of gouache, hoping  to increase the solidity of  the bare tree branches located in the blue violet shadow on the lower left.

the panel, taped for laying in color across the top register. The representational content is 85% to 95% complete

the panel, taped for laying in color across the top register. The representational content is 90% to 95% complete … ?

Yesterday I decided to stop working on the trees; not permanently … but to begin deciding what to do with the upper third of the image. I flirted with at least six or seven possibilities. Maybe a very thin red horizontal band and a muted blue grey above it? Two blue bands with several small vertical shapes in rich yellow and dark muted green clustered in the upper right corner? or perhaps in the upper left? In the end, I decided to keep this one more simple. Two tonally related but different blue bands, the darker and more intense one across the top.

Here it is with the color bands completed. I  still think that a combination of small staggered vertical bands, interrupting the major horizontals. might be interesting. But, for now, I’ll leave it as it is, tidy-up up the “loose-ends” and move on.

 

Almost completed panel!

An almost completed panel!

I do like it. Maybe I can be happy with this one as it is.

 

IMG_2329As I said above, the other two are proving to be much harder to bring to a satisfactory conclusion.

Like the painting above, I have reference sketches and photos from last fall, as well as compositional studies for this painting. The finished maple tree in autumn was to have a strip (possibly broken into a few vertical blocks) on the right side … and maybe a “free floating” block of color somewhere inside the composition in the lower left. I was pretty sure of what I wanted it to look like; now I have almost no clear vision of how it should end up!

 

The next one, a smaller horizontal piece, was started in the summer of 2012 … and I never really quite loved it.

On the Edge, Late Summer (as "completed" in 2012)

On the Edge, Late Summer  (as originally “completed in 2012)

Here it is to the right. What I liked was the general rhythm of the stalks across the field. But despite the passible late summer humidity-laden coloration, it doesn’t feel like the design is dynamic enough.

Below is the new revision so far. Originally the red-violet band was wider … the width of what is now both the dark olive green and the red-violet color panels. The newly white area is going to get a drawing of the same heather (maybe two drawings?) at earlier stage(s) in the plant’s growth/maturation process. I have left the white a bit translucent so that a “ghost” of the original color and drawing do show through.

summer 2014 revisions, so far

the summer of 2014 revisions, so far

 

Maybe I am being indecisive. I do know that I am being pretty picky (or is it just being fickle?).

As I said Mash-up isn’t quite the right word for my combination of classicism and the early modern. I am not sure what is the right description … but I will post progress on these two a bit later.

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Exhibition of Sketches open, Reception today!

May 2, 2014

Sometimes little things are really quite important. Certainly the smallest thing can be extremely satisfying.

I have a new show opening today in Charlottesville, Virginia at Angelo (on the downtown pedestrian mall). It is a wonderful small venue. The show itself is also small, just 14 pieces. All the work is quite small too!

After my big shows of really BIG drawings earlier this winter, it is really a nice treat to put up these smaller, more intimately scaled pieces.

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And these works are interesting and exciting to me precisely because they are more personal, intimate, and quick in terms of the art making. All of them are landscape sketches, most started and finished in one session … with the simplest of materials. There are a few that are almost panoramic in vision despite their very small scale.  A few are really close-ups of landscape details. Most of them though are fairly typical landscape images … at least they are typical to my eye.

The best ones are done very quickly and quite simply.  A few have a hint of Demuth or Marin (not so much Homer or Girtin this time) … and just maybe the quickness (if not the sublime quality) of a Turner watercolor.  The less successful ones may help me create better larger works but, of course, I don’t share those. They are now “working” sketches. You would have to come to my studio or one of my classes to see those.

The ones at Angelo for the next two months are, I think … pretty good.

If you are near Charlottesville sometime between May 1st and June 30th, please take a look and tell me if you agree.

(PS It would be wonderful to see you at the opening too … sometime between 5:00 and 7:30.)

 

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Going from study to “finished piece” … and back again!

January 9, 2014

Earlier this week I posted about a work (the working title was “Vixen”) that I finished a bit before the end of 2013.

Voxis Vulpis, mixed media on Mylar, 2013

Voxis Vulpis                                                            (the previous working title was “Vixen”)                                                         60×42, mixed media on Mylar, 2013

That piece is part of my on-going Natural-Family-History series; a group of large to installation sized mixed media draws that incorporate and align images from nature/natural history and from my family history as well.

Most of the time I work up the constituent parts of the drawing’s content pretty fully; If for no other reason, it becomes necessary to do so because of the size of these works. Most of the time though, I don’t plan the entire composition. It isn’t that I can’t. I certainly have worked that way in the past. I taught my students how and why it can be such a great practice.

Instead, I have been using a modified, jazz influenced praxis. Utilizing a hybrid hand-digital sketching process for the parts of the drawing, I can then create digital enlargements. Then I work up multiple sizes of the visual elements. With these and projections, I can experiment and improvise … sliding the pieces around as if in a collage.

Now, that has been the practice of late. But ever-so-often I do back track to a more traditional way of working and produce some  1/4 to 1/2 scale studies. In fact, the mylar drawing, Voxis Vulpis actually began as just such a study on paper. I thought it might be interesting to look at how I tried  to work up the image/idea. And how the study went so very badly … and made a come back … as a very different work!

view of studio wall with study, sketches and visual resources

View of studio wall with the 36×27 inch study on paper after I erased the fox image.                                          Notice the red pencil sketch of the seated fox looking leftward and also the visual resource photograph of a fox as well

early stages of a study for "Vixen" 36x27 mixed media on paper

early stages of a study for “Vixen”                                                             36×27. mixed media on paper

To the  left is a view of the studio with the study at an early stage of the process. Note the visual resource photo and the red sketch of a seated fox pinned to the wall. The messy, playful, nearly random staining underlayer is visible … as is basic drawing of the Hawthorn branches, leaves and thorns that had been begun for the top section.

detail of the study, using a raking light to reveal remnants of the erased head of the fox

detail of the study, using a raking light to reveal subtle remnants of the erased head of the fox

If you look carefully in the lower right hand area of the study, you can see remnants  of the drawing of the seated fox planned for this section of the of the composition. The B&W image to the right may help you see the erased head, snout, and nose of the fox just a bit better.

Upon reflection, I made a pretty massive change in the direction of the image. I thought the scale to be all wrong and I was also disenchanted with that pose. I even began to dislike the drooped head posture for this piece.

After erasing the head and body of the fox, I planned to add a different version of the fox. As I made that decision, I also began working up the additional design elements on the larger mylar piece this study was the preparation piece. As I worked on the larger work, I made the decision on the version of the fox I wanted to use; one that was in a standing position with the body oriented towards the viewer’s right … but the head still looking left.

I also altered the idea of the Hawthorn branches and thorns from being done in tonal dry media … into creating them with a rich black ink.

At this point I abandoned the study.

A bit later, as I was working on another large mylar piece, I looked across the studio and saw the unfinished study still up on a wall mounted drawing board. Whether by serendipity or some internal decision making process that I was not aware of, I decided to give that sheet of paper another go.

Since I was working on a 10 ft drawing that was going to need a bird known as a Tufted Titmouse, I figured I would try adding one of those to the composition. I had drawn some before … as studies for the larger work … but had not yet included one in a composition. So here was a chance to do so despite this piece being very different than the mylar one.

My First Encounter with the Wild 36x27, mixed media on paper, 2013

My First Encounter with the Wild 36×27, mixed media on paper, 2013 

Once I added the perched Tufted Titmouse work needed some more darks through the middle section. After working up the darks in the middle and some additional changes to the top register of the page, I backed off. I let a couple of days go by … looking from time to time while in the studio. After some small adjustments … I stopped  “tinkering” and decided it was done.

Now that it is complete, I realize that it isn’t really like either of the finished works it helped me prepare for anymore. That’s ok. The “study” went it’s own way and is now an independent work. I like it enough that I think that I’ll include it in my upcoming exhibit at Mary Baldwin College.

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Stanley Spencer; Modernist & Realist

November 24, 2013

Self-portrait, Stanley Spencer, 1914

Self-portrait, Stanley Spencer, 1914

Some Realists make work that reminds me of wonderful and simple sugar candy; a rush of pure visual excitement, easy on the eyes, and nothing complicated. (Yes, I know it isn’t easy or uncomplicated to paint that way; just try to create a delicate and sensual confection like Fairfield Porter’s work!)

Then there are Realists so enigmatic that their work creates all kinds of quandaries which rattle about in my head for a long time. Those are the Realists that I love most.

In the States, I immediately think of the works of Andrew Wyeth or of Raphael Soyer. The former stretches credulity and design into a wonderfully complex matrix. Soyer, seemingly effortlessly, pushes you towards his subjects personal space … involving you, almost uncomfortably in their lives somehow.

In England, I am entranced by the life and art of Stanley Spencer. His work, to my eye at least, stands as a very modern type of realism. Maybe not the rough, even harsh newer realism of Lucien Freud but still modern and engaging. (I haven’t yet read anything to tell me that L. F. was influenced by Spencer, but I suspect that he was.)

Terry's Lane, Cookham circa 1932 by Sir Stanley Spencer 1891-1959

Terry’s Lane, Cookham, c. 1932

Spencer, as an artist who matured within sight of the first World War nearly a century ago, certainly had access to both the grand traditions of the past and the visual ideas of the new century at his disposal. He continually experimented with elements of both in his art.

We can see in his drawing and painting that he had the training we would associate with that tradition. We also see in his work that he had an eye for composition that was not traditional … he crowded the viewers perception, pushed his subject into our world, dragged us into his equivocally desolate and lush visions.

So to, in his life, he experimented and fumbled … ending up in a bit of a peculiar place when it came to relationships. That may have been why he lived so much of his life in and around the village of Cookham; midway between London and Oxford, a place where he could work out his own direction.

nude-1935

Nude, 1935

In the end his work did not seek refuge in some safe and comfortable romanticism for days gone by. Neither did he unquestioningly embrace and advocate everything that was new. Instead, he engaged in the tumultuous negotiations between past and present, internal and external … that we all carry within us.  You can see current events of his day in his work and timeless subjects. Not the same old take on those subjects … rather he looks upon them with a very personal perspective, and giving them a modern if sometimes quavering and enigmatic voice.

Spencer’s work and his life are not quickly or easily understood. He is not “pure and simple” unless by that you mean he is himself. That is possibly why I keep wanting to look at his work so much. To get a better insight into his work try taking a look at the site below: http://modernbritishartists.wordpress.com/2013/11/05/stanley-spencer-heaven-in-a-hell-of-war/ Rickett's Farm, Cookham Dene 1938 by Sir Stanley Spencer 1891-1959

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New work on Ohio walls!

October 7, 2010

Entente Cordiale

They are UP on the wall.

Both shows … the mylar drawings and the small panel          paintings too.

Many, many thanks to both Dennis and Margaret!

Well, I have to get back  to the studio and the classroom … so …  ‘Nuff said for now.

Landscape Revelations show

Delayed, As If In A Thicket

IT IS DONE! Well, mostly.

June 5, 2010

I spent six years making art in a wonderfully well lit studio in a very accessible location. The high ceilings and tall windows looked out over the townscape and the surrounding hills and mountains too.

And while I was done in that space by the end of december, the vagaries of winter weather were slowing down the renovations and construction projects in the new space quite a bit. Nothing like close to 50 inches of snow that won’t melt to keep excavations from taking place. Everything was stuffed in all the nooks and crannies or piled in the middle of the floor!

Well, construction is done … and the spaces have been outfitted and arranged pretty well. I am even making large scale works again.

To be sure, the studio will need some electrical and lighting upgrades as time goes along. But for now, I am really excited. Next time I will post some new photos and some art works too.


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