Posts Tagged ‘Drawings’

Working Away from Home

June 16, 2018

I sketch, draw, or paint almost anywhere.

It has been a busy late April, May, and early June for me. These past eight weeks, I have made most of my images while working away from home quite a bit. Mostly it has been around Virginia but also out in Utah, and even some while actually traveling. It doesn’t hurt that I will happily work in the full view of others … almost as easily as I do in the privacy of my studio.

Lynchburg and Staunton

Abandoned Power Station, Staunton Va.

I was invited to participate in two plein-air events this spring, one in Staunton and the other in Lynchburg. Sketching in and near the urban environment has always been an interest of mine. It shouldn’t surprise my urban sketcher friends that I began to get serious about making art way back in my teens when I would go draw the “brownstones” of Wichita KS. I still like those Hopper-esque cityscapes.

For the Lynchburg event, I was even asked to do a demo while I was there. It was fun to do the demonstration and the onlookers asked some wonderful questions. I sure hope I was informative and maybe even a little entertaining.

Fredericksburg

Market Square Steps, Fredericksburg

After being invited to demo at the Lynchburg Plein Air event, I had the distinct privilege, a really rare treat actually, to be able to attend part of a workshop offered by the Urban Sketchers of Fredericksburg. The instructor/leader of the event was Shari Blaukopf from Montreal. I have followed her work for several years now and have even recommended her to some of my students. It may seem like something of a busman’s holiday to some but I have always found it interesting to observe how fellow artist-educators go about presenting ideas to students.

The artists of this urban sketchers’ chapter and those that traveled to the workshop did some really wonderful sketches and Plein-air paintings. They were also a nice group to get to know. 

And, to be sure, Shari did a marvelous job! I will definitely still be recommending her work and her workshops to students. 

Here is a link to her blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harrisonburg

After attending a family friend’s wedding in the small town of Broadway recently, I stopped in the city of Harrisonburg to get myself an iced tea. I then settled in along a street that I have driven down many, many times since coming to Virginia. What was drawing my attention this day was the sweep of a low brick wall and the deep shadows that played in the trees and inside the walled area beyond the entrance. After three to four sketches to work out what interested me the most, I was able to execute a fairly fresh and simple watercolor of the scene.

Sketches, Liberty Street Harrisonburg

Ink & Watercolor Sketch, Liberty Street Harrisonburg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Late May on Liberty Street., Harrisonburg

Back when I was a professor, as spring would melt into early summer, teaching would wind down and a bit of a respite would settle into my routine. I am reminded that back then summers were often the time of year that I traveled most. (Truthfully, it probably also had something to do with being a parent as well.) As I have re-organized my life to be pretty much a full-time artist … I still find that I end up doing many of my major trips away from home during these three to five months of summer-like weather. And for the past few years, when early June comes around, I get to judge art for about a week. So it is back on the road I go! 

This year, I definitely had to travel to that gig. I will post more about traveling as an artist (on the road and in the air) very soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Large Landscape Works on Paper

April 11, 2017

I am always on the lookout for interesting art work … in person or out in the digital universe.  Recently, while trying to find examples of engaging artworks for my students to connect to, I came across the work of Michelle Lauriat.

Michele Lauriat, Phil's Hill (#3)

Mixed media, 90×55, from the Phil’s Hill series

 

Frankly, I was surprised and so very excited to find her large works combining drawing and painting on paper. I think my pleasure was so intense because she works much as I do in my sketching … but does so on such a larger scale. The work also reminds me just a bit of the image making path that I was on in my early 20’s.  So, I feel enthralled by the newness and freshness of her work while also sensing a degree of aesthetic kinship.

 

 

Mixed media, Echo Lake Series, 55×42

Ms. Lauriat’s pieces hover between drawing and full-bodied painting; making use of discrete but rich patches of color as well as subtle staining of the surfaces. Using copious amounts of negative space along with fields of color and value, she carefully articulates space/depth and a tentative feeling of solidity. While there is much visible evidence of early exploratory gestural mark making that she has left exposed and even foregrounded, there are also areas that she fills with marks and passages that hint at or describe perceived textures and also bolster the visceral activation of the surface design of her work.


I see Lauriat’s working method combining a decisively bold, and at times elegant, editing process with an eye for richly observed and rendered details from the natural world.  The results are exquisite combinations of mimetic accuracy and dramatic abstraction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Her website is visually easy to explore and she blogs at … http://blog.michelelauriat.com

Enjoy!

 

Exhibition of Sketches open, Reception today!

May 2, 2014

Sometimes little things are really quite important. Certainly the smallest thing can be extremely satisfying.

I have a new show opening today in Charlottesville, Virginia at Angelo (on the downtown pedestrian mall). It is a wonderful small venue. The show itself is also small, just 14 pieces. All the work is quite small too!

After my big shows of really BIG drawings earlier this winter, it is really a nice treat to put up these smaller, more intimately scaled pieces.

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And these works are interesting and exciting to me precisely because they are more personal, intimate, and quick in terms of the art making. All of them are landscape sketches, most started and finished in one session … with the simplest of materials. There are a few that are almost panoramic in vision despite their very small scale.  A few are really close-ups of landscape details. Most of them though are fairly typical landscape images … at least they are typical to my eye.

The best ones are done very quickly and quite simply.  A few have a hint of Demuth or Marin (not so much Homer or Girtin this time) … and just maybe the quickness (if not the sublime quality) of a Turner watercolor.  The less successful ones may help me create better larger works but, of course, I don’t share those. They are now “working” sketches. You would have to come to my studio or one of my classes to see those.

The ones at Angelo for the next two months are, I think … pretty good.

If you are near Charlottesville sometime between May 1st and June 30th, please take a look and tell me if you agree.

(PS It would be wonderful to see you at the opening too … sometime between 5:00 and 7:30.)

 

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Of Tattoos and Miracles

December 9, 2013

about “Tatoos & Miracles”

First, NO, I don’t have any tattoos of loons or anything else. No, I don’t want one either. But, in recent months I have sometimes posted about the art in my Natural-Family-History series. Those large drawings on mylar are created to give me a place to connect my ideas and reflections about family and place. The drawings are a sort of multi-voice dialogue between scientific and totemic, mimetic and poetic imagery. Sometimes I have been hard pressed to articulate what I am doing … or at least why.

This blog (published by Muddy River Muse), at first seemingly unrelated, is on target; so on target because … better than anything I have written thus far … it hones in on a major part of what I am doing.

I too am looking for, trying to create, “outward signs.”

(I have some new Natural-Family-History series drawings progressing through the studio right now; more on them in the next few days.)

Muddy River Muse

Like all good little cradle-Anglicans of my day, when I reached the age of 12 I signed up for Confirmation class. We met crammed into a too-small but oddly symbolic “upper room” off the church balcony. I remember exactly two things from my weeks of Confirmation prep. The first is the lesson where we read and discussed the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand. The minister who taught the class took it upon himself to challenge us with some liberal theology, and pressed the point that perhaps there was more than one way to make a miracle. Perhaps Jesus didn’t conjure extra loaves and fishes out of thin air after all. Perhaps when the members of the crowd observed one person sharing the provisions he had brought, they were inspired – or shamed— into digging into their packs and bringing out their own secret stash of snacks to…

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Realism … in Drawing; Life and Politics too

October 28, 2013

Daumier was, for me at least, an acquired taste.

But having acquired the taste, I am now addicted. I would liken it to the taste of dark chocolate or smell of grinding freshly roasted coffee.

His line is so very descriptive; endlessly darting about the subject suggesting form and movement. Gesture drawing dominates the look of the drawn line; here and there alighting just for an instant to describe the physical reality Lunch in the Country (c. 1868) by Honore Daumier, part of the Visions of Paris exhibitionwe sense more than see. His drawing is so unlike some of the other masters of line from France around his time … excellent draughtsmen such as Ingres, Gerome, Prud’hon, and Degas.

Daumier was part of the French wing of the Realist movement in the early 19th century. He worked pretty prolifically in painting and drawing. His work in wax sculpture is not as well known but is quite exciting if a bit enigmatic. What he is perhaps best known for is his drawings on lithographic stone for newspaper illustrations and political cartoons.

I said that his drawing was different from his more well known contemporaries and near-contemporaries. So are his subjects. He depicts working class folks with generosity and compassion. He pokes a little fun at middle class folk when they key-55-24700seem pretentious. He really skewers the aristocrats and the arrogant wielders of cultural, political, and economic power mercilessly … especially so in his lithographic cartoons. More than once, he got himself into a bit of political trouble; especially so his famous print The Rue Transnonain from 1834 helped fuel political demonstrations and riots.

Daumier was well respected then by his realist contemporaries like Courbet, many of his works were smaller, more intimately scaled … and often more intimate in their conception as well. Because of that, his work may have overlooked when displayed in the lavish Salons Exhibitions of the day.

As an artist, I certainly like Daumier on many levels. I love his active use of line to describe form in movement. His pictorial design, while looking grounded in very 19th century concepts about picture making (at least to my eyes) has an immediacy and a rawness that presages much of the “in-your-face” strategies of contemporary work. There can be no denying that Daumier’s content isn’t compelling and forceful or intimate and nuanced by turns. But there is one subject in his work that I have to admit really gets my attention. It isn’t the thing he is most widely admired for either. To some, it may seem just a little to arcane, a little to precious a subject.

I really love the prints and paintings of folks perusing the folios in print shops. Daumier, who made a lot key-15-new-24696of his professional career
selling prints, must have seen these folks regularly. He needed them. They where one of his major clientele. At times he makes fun of some for their snooty or dandified attitudes. A few look like terribly disengaged shoppers, as though they just don’t see anything they like at all. Others, he really captures their rapt attention or curiosity. Whatever he thinks of the individuals depicted amongst the displays and racks of prints, they almost always seem very human. I suspect Daumier was too.

Well there is a new show of Daumier’s work that has just opened at Royal Academy in London. Apparently there are some art works that have not been seen outside of private collections in almost 200 years. If you would like a little more info about that show, I suggest taking a look at the blog listed below.

http://jollygoodnews.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/royal-academy-gives-daumier-first-british-show-in-50-years

If, on the other hand, you can’t make it to London and you want to see the most notorious print by Daumier you don’t have to go that far. A wonderful example of Daumier’s Rue Transnonain (1934) is on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

It has been a bit SKETCHY, so far.

July 25, 2012

It is a tad more than half over and it has already been a busy, busy summer in the studio! Yes, I taught a small drawing class, I took a break and judged art out in Utah, and there was that wonderful working vacation to look at galleries in Atlanta (see my previous posts about the Atlanta galleries and especially about Kevin Cole’s work). But making and prepping art work for two shows this fall is really keeping me hopping … and happy.

View S.W. from Old White Bridge Road, 2012

The first show is in Virginia, at the gallery of the Staunton-Augusta Art Center. Since I am hanging work in both their larger gallery and their more intimate small gallery, I decided to divide my show into two separate but similar bodies of work. For that smaller gallery, I figure on hanging about 25 sketches. My thought was that the small size of the works would fit the space and feel of the gallery nicely. These sketches will probably be quieter, simpler and perhaps a little bit more playful than their larger cousins in the main gallery.

For the sketches; I have been using pencil, ink, and wash drawings. A few of the sketches are done in full color. For those, I have worked in watercolor or water-soluble drawing media. When I am feeling visually playful though, I am apt to combine many of those materials in one sketch! There maybe another kind of surprise in this quieter show. I am including some sketches that definitely look like they are E. 20th Century Modern; others feel like they are just out of the 18th or 19th century (think: École des Beaux-Arts or Royal Art Academy). A few have elements of both; makes me a little bit giddy.

To get a nice group of sketches together, this year I have followed my own advice and kept sketchbooks at hand all the time. And I have been scouring the roads on both sides of the mountains … every trip, every errand.  I have been more likely to stop beside the road, wander down a creek bed, or scramble up a ravine than to get home on time. I hope I haven’t been to late to often, but the sketching has been wonderful. Relaxing and challenging all at once. Again, hopping … and completely happy.

I will have to write about the larger works … the paintings that will be in the larger front gallery in Staunton and the drawings in the Calhoun, Georgia show … a little later.  For now, it is time to get back into the studio.  And get another image started …


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