Posts Tagged ‘Virginia’

Lovely Respite In The Gallery …

January 24, 2019

Earlier this week I got to see an exhibition at a local gallery. It was a real treat.

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The venue, the Fralin Museum of Art (the former Bayly Museum) at the University of Virginia is small but quite well laid out and is well worth a visit anytime you are nearby. The exhibit highlights early works by Georgia O’Keefe … especially those that were done while she was living in Charlottesville VA and was a student and later an assistant instructor in UVa’s summer program.

Anyone who has studied O’Keefe’s early paintings and images-1drawings knows that she was influenced by many of the contemporaneous art movements including Fin de Siècle design, Post-Impressionism, the Symbolist movement, the ideas of Wassily Kandinsky, and most especially the ideas and later the instruction of Arthur Wesley Dow. You can see all those elements in her work in this exhibition. The curators of the show have included lots of historical ephemera, books and class registration materials from O’Keefe’s summers at UVa, as well as sketches and photographs.

This exhibition concentrates on Georgia O’Keefe’s work as she was transitioning from her more memetic early training at the Chicago Art Institute and the New York Art Students’s League to her much more personal way of working that utilized strategies of abstraction. The two works above are early watercolors of the building on the grounds of UVa that show Dow’s influence with an emphasis on design and the hybridizing of traditional Western and East Asian art.

The old studio art (and sometimes art history) professor part of me really loved getting to piece together what I already knew about her work and life with all the added details located here. And the inveterate sketcher in me was tickled to see the onsite watercolors from the university campus (if you are a UVa alum, sorry for not calling it “grounds”) too.

But my favorite part … what got me really excited … was seeing here the process of O’Keefe becoming a more expressive abstractionist. That is best seen in the small watercolors inspired by the hills and mountains of the Ragged Mountains and Blue Ridge of the Appalachians. She experienced them directly; exploring, hiking, and camping in those peaks and valleys which are visible to the southwest and west of  Charlottesville.

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pictured above and below are: Blue Hill II, Pink and Blue Mountain, and Evening.                   Watercolors on paper, all 1916 

These watercolors are are small and simple. And, to me, profoundly compelling in their fresh, simple directness. There is certainly more than a few hint of the much more well known, even famous, early watercolors she created soon after while she was teaching in western Texas. The charcoal drawings and watercolor of this period launched her career as a seminal figure in early 20th century American modernist art. And they are fun to look at too!

If you can get to the exhibit before it closes, I recommend the visit.  If not, I am sorry; but you could contact the Georgia O’Keefe Museum in Santa Fe. That museum organized a similar exhibition that ran from 2014-2016. They might just have made a catalog for that show.

Thanks for reading here today. If you have any questions or thoughts, please do comment below or get in touch via email. You can also connect via my website.

 

 


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Exhibition of Sketches open, Reception today!

May 2, 2014

Sometimes little things are really quite important. Certainly the smallest thing can be extremely satisfying.

I have a new show opening today in Charlottesville, Virginia at Angelo (on the downtown pedestrian mall). It is a wonderful small venue. The show itself is also small, just 14 pieces. All the work is quite small too!

After my big shows of really BIG drawings earlier this winter, it is really a nice treat to put up these smaller, more intimately scaled pieces.

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And these works are interesting and exciting to me precisely because they are more personal, intimate, and quick in terms of the art making. All of them are landscape sketches, most started and finished in one session … with the simplest of materials. There are a few that are almost panoramic in vision despite their very small scale.  A few are really close-ups of landscape details. Most of them though are fairly typical landscape images … at least they are typical to my eye.

The best ones are done very quickly and quite simply.  A few have a hint of Demuth or Marin (not so much Homer or Girtin this time) … and just maybe the quickness (if not the sublime quality) of a Turner watercolor.  The less successful ones may help me create better larger works but, of course, I don’t share those. They are now “working” sketches. You would have to come to my studio or one of my classes to see those.

The ones at Angelo for the next two months are, I think … pretty good.

If you are near Charlottesville sometime between May 1st and June 30th, please take a look and tell me if you agree.

(PS It would be wonderful to see you at the opening too … sometime between 5:00 and 7:30.)

 

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New Paintings, Watercolor on Panels

September 13, 2012

I am happily exhausted. And the studio is a raging mess. I delivered a solo show Monday and yesterday … a show with 44 pieces.

Lately I have posted images of the quick sketches … wash and brush drawings and quite a few of the watercolor and pencil pieces too.

Creekside Ferns
Watercolor on Panel, 12×12

But I have been working on some paintings as well. Each of these pieces are aqueous media on (Ampersand) panels. As with the two images below, most of the pieces for this show are done in traditional transparent watercolor. I will admit though that a few also have a touch or two of gouache; what the English waterclourists referred to as “body color.”

(Actually, using body color IS the older traditional method, but it had fallen out of favor for many painters during the last 100 years or so. For me, if it was good enough for Richard Parks Bonnington and Winslow Homer … I can use it too.)

Misty Mountains, Crozet
Watercolor on Panel, 12×12

Asian Dogwood Pods
Watercolor on Panel, 12×12

As is usual for me of late, there is also a little bit of a twist. In some of the paintings I have employed the strategy of including blocks of color; color passage that both obscure parts of the subject matter in the painting … and which actually set up some type of color harmony within the composition. Those pieces are single panel images (like the Creekside Fern one at the start of this blog) and also multi-panel works. These paintings are actually mixed aqueous media; making use of watercolor, gouache, acrylic and even a latex based paint.

The show is open today and  I have just seen the installation. Quite pleased is an understatement; I think it is really well done. The front gallery, where all the paintings on panel are displayed, is a large, open, and airy space. Most of the smaller watercolor studies and sketches are displayed is an intimate little gallery, a space flooded with soft light. In this smaller space about 20 works are arranged and clustered rather pleasingly. And in the transition space between the two galleries there hangs two very large watercolors on paper and a grouping several of my small works too.

The exhibition runs through November 9th at the Staunton Augusta Art Center. For those of you who are local, the opening reception is Friday, September 14th, from 5-7.

Now, about that messy studio …

Quick Color …

September 1, 2012

While I often draw and paint monochromatically outside, I also like to do small color studies. Many have a full range of color. Others, like the first and last one below, have just a few hints of hue … not enough to carry the full weight of the original scene … but just enough to give me a hint when I take it back to the studio. Or maybe enough to send me back to the location later to work up a painting on site!
For my color sketches, the work is done with pencil and watercolor. In some sketches, I rely mostly on the watercolor, in others the pencil work is more important. Usually though, I let them play pretty much equal roles. That isn’t the “accepted” way to work with watercolor. But it is the way I like to work.

This, of course, this is just a preview of a few pieces that will be in my upcoming exhibit in Staunton, Virginia. Let me know if you liked one of these. It is great to get a little feedback.

This, of course, this is just a preview of a few pieces that will be in my upcoming exhibit in Staunton, Virginia. Let me know if you liked one of these. It is great to get a little feedback.

More than twenty of these sketches (and to be sure … the larger paintings too) will be viewable from September 14th (reception 5-7 p.m.) at the Staunton Augusta Art Center. I hope you can come … I would certainly love to see you there!

For more exhibit info … check out:  http://saartcenter.org

Landscape Revelations: Watermedia Paintings & Watercolor Sketches”, (John A. Hancock, Watermedia Paintings and Drawings)

It has been a bit SKETCHY, so far.

July 25, 2012

It is a tad more than half over and it has already been a busy, busy summer in the studio! Yes, I taught a small drawing class, I took a break and judged art out in Utah, and there was that wonderful working vacation to look at galleries in Atlanta (see my previous posts about the Atlanta galleries and especially about Kevin Cole’s work). But making and prepping art work for two shows this fall is really keeping me hopping … and happy.

View S.W. from Old White Bridge Road, 2012

The first show is in Virginia, at the gallery of the Staunton-Augusta Art Center. Since I am hanging work in both their larger gallery and their more intimate small gallery, I decided to divide my show into two separate but similar bodies of work. For that smaller gallery, I figure on hanging about 25 sketches. My thought was that the small size of the works would fit the space and feel of the gallery nicely. These sketches will probably be quieter, simpler and perhaps a little bit more playful than their larger cousins in the main gallery.

For the sketches; I have been using pencil, ink, and wash drawings. A few of the sketches are done in full color. For those, I have worked in watercolor or water-soluble drawing media. When I am feeling visually playful though, I am apt to combine many of those materials in one sketch! There maybe another kind of surprise in this quieter show. I am including some sketches that definitely look like they are E. 20th Century Modern; others feel like they are just out of the 18th or 19th century (think: École des Beaux-Arts or Royal Art Academy). A few have elements of both; makes me a little bit giddy.

To get a nice group of sketches together, this year I have followed my own advice and kept sketchbooks at hand all the time. And I have been scouring the roads on both sides of the mountains … every trip, every errand.  I have been more likely to stop beside the road, wander down a creek bed, or scramble up a ravine than to get home on time. I hope I haven’t been to late to often, but the sketching has been wonderful. Relaxing and challenging all at once. Again, hopping … and completely happy.

I will have to write about the larger works … the paintings that will be in the larger front gallery in Staunton and the drawings in the Calhoun, Georgia show … a little later.  For now, it is time to get back into the studio.  And get another image started …

Uptown Gallery Workshop; Judging @ GSE, VMRC

April 24, 2011

My daughter, now studying illustration, used to complain that I judged things to harshly. Well, that is what she said as a teenager anyway.  As an art instructor, I always tried to think about the balance between challenging and encouraging my students, between being really humane while being completely honest.

Well this spring, while I was sending some of my work out for being judged for shows around the country …. I was judging again … this time for the North Carolina Governor’s School VISUAL Art auditions and the VMRC show in Virginia. Turn about is fair play.

And it helped that I was getting outside both my studio and my regular classroom settings too.  I had the pleasure of teaching a workshop at an artist’s co-op.  Great students, and so much fun to work with too. Nothing like seeing other folks play/experiment  with your ideas and techniques to stoke the engines of creative desire!

Above & below are some of their collage work.  An exciting spring indeed!

Studio Trauma!

June 5, 2010

Well, there you go!  The winter of 2015/2016 was a a mess.

Water, water, water, and finally more water. Four plumbing based floods atop some poor construction decisions (years before we ever bought the space) added up to disaster! Our walk out basement household storage area, the utility room, my studio storage and both the small work studio and the large studio (the converted garage) were effectively un-usable!

It might not really qualify as a disaster, but it was certainly a serious dose of family and professional disruption, a messy state of affairs! That has been the story around here; for close to five months now!

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The large painting space where I work on the mylar drawings and larger works on paper, and the early drawing phases of the multi panel pieces. Isn’t that a lovely hole where water damaged the baseboard and lower portion of the wall!

Slowly and expensively, we are getting things in order. These photos will give you some indication of the level of tear down we had to endure to get at all the problems. With this much work, it shouldn’t surprise any of my readers that we found more problems as we went along. Joys were heaped upon joys.

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Here is a view from the family storage area, past the mechanical and electrical utilities room … behind the heating and ac units is the hole in the wall we saw in the last picture. You can see where we have already begun to rip down the interior wall as well.

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View from the small painting space and the foot of the stairs, past the studio storage area and into the main portion of the basement storage area. It is a big empty space now. All the wall materials have been removed and we have only just begun to reframe the space.

While I have hated being distracted from

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Looking past the steps and utility room to both of the studio spaces

so many professional and studio plans the past few months … we have found a few silver linings. During the process we had things all apart, so we made some required and needed upgrades. (Psst … having the heater off-line for a week in the really coldest part of late winter is NO fun. Thank goodness for the fireplace and plenty of sweaters and blankets.)

 

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This is the small painting area where I work on individual panels and studies. It was the least damaged space, we only lost a door jam and some wall. But it was where books and the sketchbooks got wet and musty

 

 

We’ve also had some wonderfully skilled technicians here; I interviewed a number of new contractors for some highly technical work. It was really good fortune to meet a couple of helpful structural engineers and to work with my favorite local contractor again. (It is just to bad it wasn’t something on our list of “desired” projects!)  I have also gotten to know the ins and outs of our space SO much better too.

Now, slowly things will begin to get back to normal. I’m on the verge of being able to work a bit in the big studio. I will have to patch that wall between it and the utility room first; I’ll need to repaint the walls, doors, and floor.

Then I will have to tape, mud, and paint the new drywall in the small studio. With that done I can begin to move some of my painting supplies of the dining table! Mary has been SO patient and accommodating.

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This is the opposite view of the small studio space. Above the door is one of the pipes that ruptured and flooded the space. That leak damaged the door sill, frame and drywall.

I will also need to finish the newly repaired wall between utility and main basement space.

While I lost a few pieces of studio equipment, none of it was crucial “stuff.”  I did lose some really nice paper and supplies … a number of art books, and four or five 20-30 year old sketchbooks too. The destruction of the sketchbooks is more than a little disheartening; it really  hurts. I had hoped to pass those down to my illustrator daughter.

There will be joy though. I will have to get some new supplies of paper and such. New toys! The studio budget will be tight … but that is just how it is. It is another chance to be flexible and creative!

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a small 6×12 panel, part of a diptych I am working on … more on that a little later!

Crozet Pine, web

Crozet Pine, a recent 4×5 watercolor and pencil sketch on paper

I have to wait to ramp up production of multi-panel pieces for my fall solo show just a bit longer. I have been working on a few while teach my various classes. but that is a bit sporadic. Luckily … Spring is now here. I can more easily work on watercolor sketches and individual small watermedia panel pieces outside.  But it is time to get the bigger pieces off the ground; there are only 4 1/2 months to go!

Well, a bit of kvetching, some pride in the new and shiny parts we have gained, and a bit of hope that we never have to walk this crooked path ever again!

 

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The main studio … in happier days.  Looking forward to a return to normal!

 

 


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